Inferiority Complex Part 2

Continuation of my initial post on inferiority complex.

People suffering from inferiority complex often see themselves less attractive or less intelligent than others, or incompetent in their duties and professional callings. Sometimes, such people are in desperation to hear complimentary remarks made about their persons, their achievements for accomplishments.

Inferiority complex is sometimes reflected in tendency to shift blame or avoid personal responsibility for ones one’s failure.

Usually, persons suffering from inferiority complex get overly sensitive to criticism, no matter how constructive.

See also: Inferior Complex Part 1

Inferiority complex is a major hindrance to evangelism on campus, as believers who have such feeling often appear too intimidated to confront sinners or rebuke unwary believers who are doing the wrong.
Sometimes, campus Christians are overwhelmed by the appearance of so-called sophisticated students, when in reality such unbelieving students are merely disguising or covering up their mysteries with fashion and fad.
The Psalmist says, the righteous are as bold as a lion, then there is no justification for the believer to be bogged down under the heavy weight of inferiority complex, self-pity or fear (Proverbs 28:1).

PANACEA FOR INFERIORITY COMPLEX
The first step to overcoming inferiority complex is to affirm our position in Christ (Ephesians 2:6; Habakkuk 3:19). By virtue of the new birth, the Christian is placed higher than the world and all the negative situations in life.

The second step is to assure ourselves of God’s love for us as His dearly beloved children. Such love should banish all feelings of inferiority from our hearts and lives.

In conclusion, in order to fulfill our God-given calling or divine purpose in life, we must focus on God’s power in us, on His promises and love: not on fears or weakness (2 Timothy 1:7).

Source: Campus Koinonia Vol. 19

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